Schedule

Friday October 12, 2018
Time Activity
8:30 - 9:00 Registration
9:00 - 9:15 Opening Remarks
Talks
9:15 - 10:00 Prof. Anna Nagurney, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Sustainable Supply Chain Networks for Sustainable Cities

10:00 - 10:30 Coffee Break
10:30 - 11:15 Prof. Ivana Ljubic, ESSEC Business School

Very Large Scale Covering Location Problems in the Design of Advanced Metering Infrastructure

11:15 - 12:00 Prof. Pierre Pinson, Technical University of Denmark

Community-based and peer-to-peer electricity markets

12:00 - 13:00 Lunch
13:00 - 13:45 Prof. Hani Mahmassanni, Northwestern University

Predictive Analytics for Real-time Urban Mobility: Autonomous, Connected, Electric, Shared (ACES)

13:45 - 14:30 Prof. Chaithanya Bandi, Kellogg School of Management

Robust Optimal Design and Control of Ridesharing systems: Case study from India

14:30 - 15:00 Coffee Break
15:00 - 15:45 Prof. Xianbin Wang, University of Western Ontario

Technical Challenges and Business Opportunities of Ubiquitously Connected Society

15:45 - 16:30 Prof. Robert Shorten, University College Dublin

Distributed Ledger Technology, Cyber-Physical Systems, and Social Compliance

 

 

Abstracts

Anna Nagurney, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Title: Sustainable Supply Chain Networks for Sustainable Cities
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Abstract: Supply chains provide the critical infrastructure for the production and distribution of goods and services in our Network Economy and serve as the conduits for the manufacturing, transportation, and consumption of products ranging from food, clothing, automobiles, and high technology products, to even healthcare products. Cities as major population centers serve not only as the principal demand points but also as the locations of many of the distribution and storage facilities, transportation providers, and even manufacturers. In this talk, I describe a new model for the design of sustainable supply chains with a focus on cities that captures the frequency of network link operations, which is especially relevant to cities due to frequent freight deliveries. The model is also related to recent literature on this subject. Our goal is to demonstrate how, through the proper design (and operation) of these complex networks, waste can be reduced, along with the environmental impacts, while minimizing operational and frequency costs, and meeting demand. If time permits, I will also discuss extensions of the model using game theory.


Ivana Ljubic, ESSEC Business School

Title: Very Large Scale Covering Location Problems in the Design of Advanced Metering Infrastructure
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Abstract: Smart metering is currently replacing simple billing with intelligent metering services of tremendous value to both utility companies and end users. According to Gartner, a typical family home could contain more than 500 smart devices by 2022. For covering this exceedingly increasing demand, wireless communications will be inevitable when it comes to designing and planning of the advanced metering infrastructure (AMI).

In this talk we address the deployment of access points in the design of AMI. We embed a notion of proximity (or coverage radius) that specifies whether a given smart meter (representing a demand point, e.g., a household) can be served or ``covered'' by a potential access point location (also referred to as potential facility location). A demand point is then said to be covered by an access point location if it lies within its coverage radius. Typically, a relatively small number of potential facility locations can be considered, while the number of demand points can run in the thousands or even millions. As such, finding the optimal placement of access points in the design of AMI remained out of reach for modern MIP solvers.

In this talk we address two optimization problems relevant for the design of AMI: the maximal covering location problem (MCLP), which requires choosing a subset of facilities that maximize the demand covered while respecting a budget constraint on the cost of the facilities and the partial set covering location problem (PSCLP) which minimizes the cost of the open facilities while forcing a certain amount of demand to be covered. We propose an effective decomposition approach based on the branch-and-Benders-cut reformulation. We also draw a connection between Benders and submodular cuts.

The results of our computational study demonstrate that, thanks to this decomposition technique, optimal solutions can be found very quickly, even for benchmark instances involving up to twenty million demand points.

The talk is based on a joint work with J.F. Cordeau and F. Furini


Pierre Pinson, Technical University of Denmark

Title: Community-based and peer-to-peer electricity markets
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Abstract: The deployment of distributed renewable generation capacities, new ICT capabilities, as well as a more proactive role of consumers, are all motivating rethinking electricity markets in a more distributed and consumer-centric fashion. After motivating the design of various forms of consumer-centric electricity markets, we will focus on two alternative constructs (which could actually be unified) consisting in community-based and peer-to-peer electricity markets. The mathematical framework for these markets will be described, with focus on negotiation and clearing algorithms in a distributed and decentralized setup. Opportunities and challenges related to these markets, both mathematical and related to real-world applications, will be discussed. Especially, we will look at fairness aspects, product differentiation, as well as design of network charges to account for 'actual' usage of network.


Hani Mahmassanni, Northwestern University

Title: Predictive Analytics for Real-time Urban Mobility: Autonomous, Connected, Electric, Shared (ACES)

Abstract: Like many other domains, transportation is undergoing deep and significant transformation, seeking to fulfill the promise of connected mobility for people and goods, while limiting its carbon footprint. Autonomous vehicles will likely change the economics ownership and use of private automobiles, accelerating trends towards greater use of shared fleet services provided by private TNCs (Transportation Network Companies). We interpret developments in connected and autonomous vehicle technologies, in the broad context of the Internet of Things (IoT) and smart cities; identify likely deployment scenarios; and highlight implications and opportunities for both network management as well as mobility service delivery models. Examples are provided on: (1) the use of new data streams from connected vehicle systems for real-time system operation, and the role of prediction in this context; (2) algorithms for real-time mobility services under different operational models. We close with a discussion of open questions regarding cooperative vs. competitive behavior at the network level.


Chaithanya Bandi, Kellogg School of Management

Title: Robust Optimal Design and Control of Ridesharing systems: Case study from India

Abstract: Ride sharing’s potential to improve traffic congestion as well as assist in reducing CO2 emission and fuel consumption was recently demonstrated by recent works. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that ride sharing can be implemented within a sound economic regime, providing values for all participants (e.g., Uber, Lyft,Grab etc.). In this talk, I will describe my experience with one of the major ride sharing services in India where we collaborated to investigate two key problems arising in operating the rideshare service: that of design which deals with deciding how to position drivers across the cities and that of control which is done through careful pricing. We develop a queueing theory based framework and develop algorithms based on Robust Optimization. I will end the talk describing an implemented version of our algorithm and present results from a typical day.


Xianbin Wang, University of Western Ontario

Title: Technical Challenges and Business Opportunities of Ubiquitously Connected Society

Abstract: The expeditious evolution of Internet-of-Things (IoT) technologies and their convergence with diverse industry and business applications signify the coming next wave of our increasingly connected society. With the dramatically growing data traffic, massive connected devices and diverse services to be supported, the success of our connected society rely heavily on our capabilities in the overcoming the technical challenges of industry transformation and new business development. The focus of this talk is to analyze the main technical challenges of connected society, identify the essential key enabling technologies and business opportunities, and present our ongoing research and activities in the related areas. Specifically, this talk will cover the following aspects: i) Technical challenges of managing massive data; ii) Security enhancement over large-scale IoT systems iii) Emerging business/industry opportunities in future connected society.


Robert Shorten, University College Dublin

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Title: Distributed Ledger Technology, Cyber-Physical Systems, and Social Compliance

Abstract: This talk describes how Distributed Ledger Technologies can be used to design a class of cyber-physical systems, as well as to enforce social contracts and to orchestrate the behaviour of agents trying to access a shared resource. The first part of the paper analyses the advantages and disadvantages of using Distributed Ledger Technologies architectures to implement certain control systems in an Internet of Things (IoT) setting, and then focuses on a specific type of DLT based on a Directed Acyclic Graph. In this setting we propose a set of delay differential equations to describe the dynamical behaviour of the Tangle, an IoT-inspired Directed Acyclic Graph designed for the cryptocurrency IOTA. The second part proposes an application of Distributed Ledger Technologies as a mechanism for dynamic deposit pricing, wherein the deposit of digital currency is used to orchestrate access to a network of shared resources. The pricing signal is used as a mechanism to enforce the desired level of compliance according to a predetermined set of rules. After presenting an illustrative example, we analyze the control system and provide sufficient conditions for the stability of the network.